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Making Clothes Fit

Discussion in 'Avatars' started by Cmdr Brannick, Oct 29, 2018.

  1. Cmdr Brannick

    Cmdr Brannick New Member

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    Cmdr Brannick
    Hey,
    This is my first time making my own custom avatar, and I was wondering how people fit clothes so well to their characters in Blender. I mostly have trouble with the breasts and butt as they're rounded areas. I don't particularly want to be pulling each vertex into place, so I was wondering if there were easier ways or maybe multiple ways to get a single job done?
    Please and thank you for any and all help.
     
    #1 Cmdr Brannick, Oct 29, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2018
  2. Vectorius

    Vectorius New Member

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    One way to get a starting point is to duplicate the mesh part the clothing item covers. So if you are making a t-shirt, duplicate the torso and shoulders and work your way from there. Simple models often have loops around these areas, and because you are using the model's own topology, it should bend properly (assuming the base mesh already has weight painting.)
     
  3. Cmdr Brannick

    Cmdr Brannick New Member

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    Thank you for the reply but I don't understand. I'm sorry, I'm a complete novice at this. I can make avatars I've just never made a model from scratch or parts. By any chance are there any videos or something that could explain what you mean?
     
  4. Vectorius

    Vectorius New Member

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    The method I described can be seen here.

    This tutorial is for making a very basic model in Blender.

    I suggest you learn these commands and how to use them:
    • Modeling - Extrude, Fill Face, Rip, Grid Fill, Bridge, Separate, Merge, Inset, Bevel, Loop Cut, Knife Cut, Proportional Editing, Edge Slide
    • Selecting - Loop-, Edge-, and Vertex Selection, Expand/Contract Selection, Circle Select, Box Select
    • Camera - nearly all camera controls are on the number keypad, including switching between orthographic and perspective
    Once you learn these, you can actually look up modeling tutorials from other programs and "translate" what is being done. One of the better human low poly modeling tutorials is by James Taylor using Maya.

    As modeling becomes more familiar to you, you can look up Speed Modeling videos and pause them at times when you spot something you might learn. Magna Omega has very good speed modeling videos done in Blender.