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Which version of DirectX does VRChat run on?

Discussion in 'General' started by Meme_Man, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. Meme_Man

    Meme_Man Member

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    Is this a stupid question? I ask because I want to know if I can use directx 11 shaders.
     
  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous New Member

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    It uses DirectX 11
     
  3. Lhun

    Lhun Member

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    dx11 sadly - if they went to dx12 x64 (most headsets require it so it's a bit of a no brainer) the game performance would skyrocket.
     
    Mr.Crane likes this.
  4. potatochobit

    potatochobit Member

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    yeah but then alot of old graphic cards would not work
    and no one from russia or south america could connect lol
     
  5. Lhun

    Lhun Member

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    That's a misnomer. DX11 cards do dx12 just fine.
    For example, the 390x 8gb is faster than the RX480 in almost all workloads, even though one is dx11. However, in DX12, the RX480 pulls ahead, but just barely. They can both play the same games. It's efficiency and optimization.
    The only thing that can't do dx12 is Windows 7. Windows 8.1 and 10 do it just fine. On top of that, they can build both binaries. There's no reason they can't release a slightly less compatible dx12 x64 or vulcan version with amd liquidvr and nvidia vrworks single pass stereo and make everything awesome for everyone.
    Just to be clear, the GTX 970 for example is DX11. It plays dx12 games just fine.
     
  6. Mr.Crane

    Mr.Crane Member

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    On the NV homepage it says "DirectX 12 API" and it runs DX 12 games. Back in the days of DX 8/9 it didn't even run a DX9 game on a DX8 card for example if the game didn't have a fallback mode. So why is the 970 DX11, what do you mean? I guess it's not supporting all features...
     
  7. Lhun

    Lhun Member

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    It means a few things. Sometimes not all the features are supported in hardware or accelerated in hardware. Other things use "software mode" and your cpu has to do the work.

    It's not a "hard stop" or that games won't run. Windows 10 uses dx12, but you can install and use it on old hardware. Certain dx12/vulcan/opengl v. whatever FEATURES might require hardware support, but not always.

    To clarify,
    DirectX feature levels and point updates are not the same thing.

    For example, I COULD launch and play street fighter V on my 560ti on windows 10 just fine, but some aspects of the UI were missing because capcom didn't write software mode fallback support and required hardware support for certain things in dx10/11 when it saw nvidia drivers.

    A DirectX feature level defines the level of support a GPU gives while still supporting the
    underlying specification. This capability was first introduced in DirectX 11. Microsoft defines a feature level as “a well defined set of GPU functionality".

    To understand why Microsoft built DirectX 12 the way it did, consider the alternative. Prior to DirectX 11, every new DirectX version was tied to new hardware requirements. This is no longer the case. From time to time, AMD or Nvidia might implement a specific feature in hardware before it became part of a future DirectX standard, but graphics cards were fixed to the DirectX APIs they supported at launch. Without the flexibility afforded by feature levels, the only gamers who could take advantage of DX12 would be those who purchased either a GCN 1.1, 1.2, or Maxwell GPU. Everyone else, including the millions of people with slightly older cards, would’ve been left out in the cold.

    DX12 is honestly "free beer" performance improvements. When AMD, Nvidia, and Intel talk about supporting DirectX 12 on older hardware, they’re talking about the features that matter most — lower-overhead APIs, better CPU utilization, and multi-GPU functionality. The actual feature levels that define 12_1 as being different from 11_0 are interesting and useful in certain scenarios, but they aren’t the capabilities that will truly shape how gamers experience gaming with the API.